Improve Your Wahoo Fishing Skills




Meet a Northeast Florida Wahoo Fishing Maestro.

Tim Altman hoists a large wahoo hanging off the coast of Jacksonville.

Jacksonville-based Saltwater Challenge captain Tim Altman is lagging behind at 20 knots. His trolling weights weigh 6 pounds. Its lures weigh 4 pounds. The giant wahoo is his target, and he’s very good at his game.

Tim targets wahoo year round, but December through April is his favorite season. “Let it get so cold that all the coastal water on the 28 fathom ledge is below 70 degrees and the large ledge that marks the start of the continental shelf will be magical,” Tim said. “Let the temperature get to 70 degrees on the beach and they’re likely to be anywhere.”

“Let the temperature get to 70 degrees on the beach and they’re likely to be anywhere.”

“I’ll let the technology tell me where to fish using the Roffs fishing satellite charts, and if I have to split the day, I’ll let the solunar tables tell me when,” he added.

Keep in mind that trolling at 20 knots for 8 hours covers an incredible 160 miles. Tim reiterates the importance of organizing your day.

“In fact, I have kept records of what time the wahoo is likely to bite in particular places. There is nothing like a school of blue runners to make me drag a spot. Apart from the obvious bait on the surface, we are moving from a proven bottom structure to a more extensive bottom structure. The anglers make the best new crew for me. Find me a big school of beeliners in 70 degree water and I’ll show you a big wahoo.

“Find me a big school of beeliners in 70 degree water and I’ll show you a big wahoo.”

High speed wahoo fishing requires specialized equipment. The goal is to keep your bait well below the surface at 20 knots. This requires a braid or line of Monel yarn. It also requires the best of swivels, crimps, friction buckles and other connections. Tim fishes a 130-pound braid at a weight of 36 to 96 ounces. It is also important to put yarn at each end of the weights as the wahoo often bites off the weight. Next is a 30 foot 300 pound mono leader to a large straight lure (usually a steel head), with a 900 pound cable between its two hooks. The goal is that your 80-pound curvy butt setup doesn’t have a weak spot that can’t withstand the violent collision of the wahoo and the 20-knot decoy.

C&H Mr. Big, typical high speed lure.

Asking Tim why he thought he caught more wahoo at 20 knots was a laughing matter. “We don’t catch wahoo anymore. We just avoid more amberjack, barracuda and other fish. We had some big mahi hits at 20 knots at times, but that’s rare. Look, if you shoot mullet or ballhoo at the places we fish, you’ll stay plugged in until you run out of leaders. Don’t look for a lot of giant wahoo in your catch. ”

Tim says his team are doing better than most when it comes to the end of the game.

Getting the hooks to stay in a wahoo’s mouth after it hits it at 20 knots is the hardest part.

“Getting stung is the easy part. Getting the hooks to stay in a wahoo’s mouth after it hits it at 20 knots is the hardest part. First of all, don’t slow down too much. Imagine his mouth is torn and you have to keep the hook from falling. This means that you have to bring him in regularly and always under pressure. ” FS

First publication of Florida Sportsman magazine in April 2018


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No Fishing Skills Required For New Seafood Cookbook | Books and Authors

MINNEAPOLIS – A career as a political journalist led Hank Shaw to five newspapers across the country, including, in the early 2000s, the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

His subsequent work as a gatherer, hunter, fisherman, and cookbook author has taken him across the world. He launched his award-winning James Beard blog, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook (honest-food.net), in 2007, and his first cookbook debuted four years later. Shaw has just released its fifth title, “Hook, Line, and Supper” (H&H Books, $ 32.95), a user-friendly guide to preparing a wide variety of fish and seafood.

Now living in Sacramento, Calif., Shaw recently visited the Twin Cities and, in conversation, shared rock-solid gripping technique, explained the concept of interchangeability, and discussed the joys of fishing.

Q: Why do you recommend fishing as a hobby?

A: Because it’s the easiest way for what I would call a civilian to enter the world of securing their own protein. Hunting is difficult, there are a lot of obstacles in the hunt. But fishing? You can buy a day’s permit, get on a boat, and have your friend – or a guide or captain – show you what to do, and you can catch your own fish.

It is a universal truth that the food you buy yourself tastes better. Anyone who has ever grown tomatoes knows this.

Q: What is your advice for the first fishing trips?

A: Use bait on the lures. Baits will catch more fish than lures.

Q: What was your goal when you wrote this book?

A: To break down the barriers. When my duck book (“Duck, Duck, Goose”) came out in 2013, my evangelical goal was to teach people how to cook a duck breast well. In this book, my Gospel goal is to teach people how to cook a piece of fish well.

Q: How about a quick tutorial?

A: There are several ways to do this. There is the trigger method. Once you’ve learned how, you can do it in eight to 10 minutes.

You salted your piece of fish and wiped it dry. The pan gets hot, then you use a very high smoke point oil. I like grape seeds, but canola works too. Then the oil gets hot. When that oil has a trickle of smoke the fish goes into the pan, and the second it goes in you shake the pan, it’s almost a shake. The piece of fish will slide over this hot oil for a second, preventing it from cementing in the pan.

Then you invert the pan and pour the hot oil over the fish until the fish turns opaque. As soon as the side of the fish that touches the pan turns that nice pretty brown – you can see it around the edges – then you put in a knob of butter. You spill this over the fish and when the butter turns brown, you remove it from the heat. You flip the fish – crispy side up – add a little pepper and you’re done.

Q: You write a lot about the interchangeability of fish. What do you mean?

A: There are broad categories of fish and seafood that can be grouped together. For example, the vast majority of freshwater fish are lean and white, and they all act the same. Of course, there are functional differences between walleye and smallmouth bass, but you can swap them out in a recipe, that’s all good.

The differences exist but they are not that critical. I have a recipe in the book that sounds esoteric, but it’s not. This is for the Thai-style fried pomfret, a fish that can be found in the Pacific Ocean. But what if you used it with walleye instead of pomfret? It would still be a good recipe. How about using it with catfish or shrimp? It would still be a good recipe.

There are very few recipes that can’t literally use everything that looks good in the supermarket.

Q: For those of us who don’t catch fish, do you have any tips for buying fish?

A: It’s a bit counterintuitive, because in the supermarket you want to go straight to the freezer section, because they buy frozen fish and thaw it for their counter. It’s better for you to thaw the fish than for them to thaw the fish, because they could have thawed it three, four, or five days ago.

Q: The more than 120 recipes in the book take a holistic approach, a strategy that is obviously rooted in your own experiences. Why is travel important to you?

A: Because everyone does things differently, even in our own country. Traveling in the United States really shows you that there are amazing things about every state. Too many Americans think their little patch of woods is the only good place, and that the people across the hill somehow aren’t real Americans, or have a bad taste for fish. . Soup wars are real.

Q: When it comes to making chowders, stews and soups, is there a common mistake?

A: The biggest thing is to put everything in the pot at the same time. Period. I have a really long section in the book on how to make a good fish or seafood stew.

Q: Do you have any initial ideas for preparing fish and seafood?

A: If there’s one cooking tip I can give to anyone, it’s this: For God’s sake, you can always cook it more, but you can’t undo something. If you are afraid, if you are new, if you are afraid of ruining something, then don’t cook it enough. You test it and then if you need it you can cook it more. Don’t kill your seafood twice.

LAKE ERIE PERCH BOILER

For 8.

Note: no perch? “Use any firm white fish,” said Hank Shaw, author of “Hook, Line, and Supper.”

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 large yellow or white onion, chopped (about 2 cups)

1 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold or other waxy potatoes, peeled and diced

1 liter of fish or clam broth

2 cups of water

1/2 teaspoon freshly chopped marjoram

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 1/2 pounds skinless perch fillets, cut into pieces

6 to 8 ounces of Polish kielbasa, sliced

1/4 cup freshly chopped dill or flat leaf parsley

1 cup sour cream, for garnish

Melt the butter in a Dutch oven or other heavy saucepan over medium heat. When the butter stops frothing, add the onions and cook gently until tender and translucent; do not let them brown.

Add the potatoes and toss to coat them in the butter. Cook 1 to 2 minutes for the butter to absorb a little. Sprinkle everything with salt. Add the fish stock, water and marjoram, season with salt and pepper. Simmer gently for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender.

Once the potatoes are tender, add the perch and kielbasa and simmer for another 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the dill (or parsley). Pour into bowls and let everyone add sour cream at the table. Serve with beer and crusty bread.

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How to Improve Your Fishing Skills and Impress Your Friends: South Florida Caribbean News

We all need a hobby in our lives if we are ever to find balance and overcome the daily stresses and chores that never end. It is important that you find an activity that gives you a sense of accomplishment as well as some inner peace. Fishing is something everyone should learn in their life. It is one of the best hobbies and it is extremely fun. However, fishing is not easy. It takes a lot of technique, skill, practice and above all patience. However, there are a few tips and tricks you can use to improve your fishing skills. Below are a few ways to improve your fishing skills and impress your friends.

1. Consider fishing lessons

If you are a beginner or an amateur and want to impress your friends with your fishing skills, you should consider taking some fishing lessons. Find an expert and learn from the best. They have the experience to keep you from making the same mistakes they did. A good mentor and teacher can help you get better at fishing in no time and impress your family and friends on any fishing trip.

2. Knowledge and practice

In order to become a professional in a certain skill, a person must possess a significant amount of knowledge about that particular skill. For a fisherman it is necessary to know the basics of fishing. A good fisherman should have sufficient knowledge of the underwater world and should know in which specific part of the ocean he would be most likely to find the best and biggest fish. To improve your fishing skills (or any skill in particular), you need to practice that skill to perfection. In order to hone your fishing skills, you need to practice every day and gain as much knowledge as possible on the subject.

3. Underwater movement and water characteristics

The fisherman should be aware of certain changes in the details of the ocean or other bodies of water. For example, they should take into consideration changes in water characteristics, such as water clarity, water shading, waves, etc. In order to achieve this goal, a fisherman must know these fundamental changes in nature so that he can easily choose at the slightest change in the properties of the water. By observing the movements of the fish, a fisherman can quickly figure out how to find the best quality fish and can easily catch his targets if there are a lot of fish in a particular location. If you have located different types of species underwater, you can adapt different types of fishing techniques to the species in order to catch them. A good eye for observation and a knowledge of the characteristics of the water make a fisherman a professional.

4. The right equipment

Regardless of your skill level, it is imperative that you stay up to date with technology. It’s okay if you can’t afford top notch gear, but at least you need to have the right gadgets to catch fish. Buy yourself a nice fishing rod and practice with this rod. Once you have practiced enough you will be an expert with your rod and start collecting more fish. The right hook, rod, and bait are the key to catching fish. Quality lines for catching fish are imperative to ensure you get the right amount of fish, and if you are looking for bass, a quality line to catch more bass would be the best idea. A good fisherman is one who has good equipment and knows how to use it to the fullest.

5. Don’t ignore the natural signs

Although this is a modern world and people use and often become entirely dependent on modern technology, there is always a need to exercise the utmost presence of mind by not avoiding natural signs. Nature shows signs all the time, but people usually ignore them. For example, you shouldn’t fish when the water waves are too high, as sea storms are very likely to occur when the water level is too high. Don’t ignore the facts of nature and show some presence of mind.

Improve your fishing skills

Fishing is a matter of patience and practice. There is no secret formula to becoming an expert overnight. Little Tips Help You Become a Better Angler, But How Much? At the end of the day, you have to practice, gain experience, and be patient. Haste takes its toll. However, we have presented these little tips and tricks that you can use to improve your fishing skills and impress your friends and family. You must be extremely attentive to movements underwater and never ignore the natural signs. With the right equipment, the right advice, and practice, you can improve your fishing skills in no time.


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Ben McLemore and Robert Covington show off their NBA bubble fishing skills

NBA teams at two of the three hotels in the Disney Reboot Center near Orlando currently have access to special maritime privileges, including a two hour ‘guided fishing experience’ with up to five people.

The Houston Rockets, who are staying at the Grand Floridian, are among the lucky teams to have access now. And on Sunday afternoon, when the team didn’t practice until later that night, goaltender Ben McLemore and forward Robert Covington accepted the league’s offer.

On his Twitter page, a happy McLemore uploaded images and videos of him fishing with Covington and assistant track coach Motoki Fujii. All three seemed rather satisfied with their catch!

“We are enjoying life” McLemore wrote. Everyone on the boat wore masks, following NBA recommended safety protocols for off-court activities to minimize potential risks from COVID-19.

Athleticism‘s Fred katz recently wrote about the navigation options available to “bubble” players in Florida. Among the options:

Players and others present have two navigation options. Participants can participate in a “Guided Fishing Experience”, a two-hour trip with up to five people authorized. They cannot take alcohol on the boat. They can also hire motor pontoon boats, again, without taking alcoholic beverages on board.

Before the scrum begins on July 22, the memo notes, only teams located in two of the three hotels frequented by the NBA, the Grand Floridian and the Yacht Club, can use the boats. This means that teams staying at the Gran Destino – which includes the Bucks, Lakers, Clippers, Raptors, Nuggets, Celtics, Jazz and Heat – must wait two weeks before enjoying full marine privileges.

The Rockets aren’t among the eight teams that have to wait, so McLemore and Covington took full advantage of the opportunity. Considering how much fun they’ve had, expect a lot more players to try it out in the next few days.

“It’s gonna be a pro [at fishing] by the time we leave ”, Covington wrote.



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New net fishing skills from anglers at “Ladies let’s go fishing!” »Event in Florida

Women from all over Florida have come together to learn fishing skills at “Ladies, Let’s Go Fishing!” (LLGF) Gulf Coast University June 27-28 at Bass Pro Shops, Fort Myers, Florida.

The event offered education, the practice of fishing techniques and an optional fishing trip.

The No Yelling School of Fishing offered classroom presentations by Captain Jon Fetter / Coastal Fisheries, Captain Debbie Hanson / Basics of Fishing, Betty Bauman / Conservation and Captain Rob Fussnecker / Best Times to Fish.

The practice of knotting, fly casting, spinning, using live shrimp and net casting techniques was led by the speakers as well as Steve Johnson and Bait Box Sanibel.

With the event postponed from March due to the coronavirus, the class was limited to encourage social distancing.

On Sunday, participants embarked on the fishing adventures of their choice from boats where they caught or released snook, snapper, redfish, sea trout and other species.

Advertising

Featured on National Network TV and more, the series is supported by major partners including the Recreational Fishing and Boating Foundation, Take Me Fishing, Vamos a Pescar, Mercury, Magic Tilt trailers, Penn, Scout Boats, Seven Seas Yacht Sales, Power-Pole and Poisson Florida. The biggest annual sponsors are Freedom Boat Club, Sunrise Resort & Marina, Future Angler Foundation, CCA Florida STAR, TACO Marine and Seaguar.

Other LLGF 2020 events, with optional fishing, include:
August 8 Scallops at Homosassa
August 14-16 Keys Fishing Learning on the Water Screamin ‘Reels Islamorada, FL
August 21-23 Weekend Seminar on Saltwater in the South Florida Sea at IGFA Dania Beach
September 12-13 Tampa Coastal Seminar at the Tampa Progressive Insurance Boat Show
October 23-25 ​​Keys Saltwater Weekend Islamorada FL Seminar


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Timeless fishing skills

1. Catch the tuna with old wooden lures

Head deep blue on a modern offshore sport fisherman, and you’ll likely be dragging new school spreader bars, squid garlands, and splashing birds that make quite a splash. All of these things put the tuna in the boat, but so do regular cedar corks. If you don’t see one on this modern boat, beware of your captain’s knowledge.

One of the oldest trolling lures ever made, Cedar Plugs have tapered wooden bodies and bullet-shaped lead heads. They are simple, but they perfectly mimic the shape of a balloon or a cigar. The leader goes through the center, allowing the hook to sit in the tail. You can buy them painted in a wide array of designs, but there’s just something about an unfinished raw wood cedar stopper that makes the magic happen, often when nothing else will. Their ability to wobble and dart, constantly changing direction, is unmatched by any decoy. You can send them any distance in your trolling spread, but the position of the corner flat line is often the killer. You want this lone cedar to dance nearby, just outside the prop wash, 10 to 15 feet from the boat. To maximize the action, keep the line as parallel as possible to the surface of the water by running it from the tip of the rod to a release clip or rubber band attached to the stern cleat. If you get a chance to watch this cedar when a big bluefin tuna dumpsters, you will never forget the boil. —Joe Cermele

2. Catch trout with live bait

When I was a kid there was a box of online roulettes in one pocket of my jacket and jars of Salmon Roe, Mealworm and PowerBait in the other on the opening day of the season. trout. The program consisted of spinning in the fast tricks and squatting with bait in the slower, deeper runs. These days I seem to see more people on the move, “power fishing” in a trout stream, than bait laid down and carefully drifting. If you think bait dipping is old man’s game, you’re missing out on big trout.

Marking reaction bites on the lures is great when the trout want to move, but 90 percent of their feeding is near the bottom. Much like in the nymph with a fly rod, the trick is a natural presentation, whether you’re drifting worms or cheesy dough. I learned from Matt Wettish, a

Connecticut-based trout guru known as Mealie Master says reducing to a 2-pound line is the first step to getting natural drift. Wettish only uses size BB split shots, adding one at a time until he has just enough weight to lightly tick the bottom. To reduce the weight even further he uses a size 12 Scud Fly hook with his worms, but I have found this hook to be equally effective with eggs and dough. —JC

Watching a bobber for hours and hours takes a lot of patience and a little faith. Burazine / Getty Images

3. Make Yourself Skunk — With Dignity

I was fortunate enough to start my fishing career in stingy waters, which instilled in me the double blessing of humility and low expectations. Camp Inverness had a small lake that was almost devoid of fish. The few who were there got pounded by boys like me, each armed with a push-button reel, hanging nightcrawler, and a red and white float the size of a snow ball. tennis. You baited, threw, and tried to drop the float under the sheer pressure of your brain waves.

Looking back, I was struck by how stubborn I was. There was a 90 minute break during those hot afternoons, and I almost always spent that time fishing and working on my sunburns. I caught a fish maybe every fourth day (and never more than one fish a day), but I never thought about not fishing. There was just nothing else at camp that I wanted to hurt so badly. My catch was all sunfish. One day, when another boy grabbed a little big mouth, he instantly rose to the rank of king of our little round table. A bass was a mature fish, a serious thing.

From all this experience, I learned nothing, by which I mean that I learned not to expect anything. Otherwise, I instinctively knew I would have gone mad with frustration. This lesson was not conscious, moreover. It was just a reaction to reality as it was structured at the time. Maybe the lure of the fishing was the act itself. I had an unusually busy mind for a 9 year old, and what I liked about fishing was the way it drowned out conscious thought. I couldn’t really think of anything else as I watched my bobber. I was just there. I was in a trance. I was fishing.

The essence of all fishing and hunting – what makes sports so appealing to some people – is uncertainty, mystery. It has always been so. Anthropologists largely attribute to this mystery the source of religion. The existence of primitive man depended on the discovery and slaughter of game, and for his survival to depend on something which he could neither control nor foresee required the intercession of divine forces. Not long after, it led to Baptists, Presbyterians, and Methodists, not to mention people skipping church to go fishing.

If you have to catch something to have a great day fishing, you should do your shopping. Nobody smells in the supermarket. Imagine what it would be like to go fishing knowing that you will be successful every time. Sounds like fun, right? Think about it, though. To have the success of your outing assured would kill the whole mystery. As well as the pleasure. My old friend Jack Unruh used to tell a joke about the man who died and woke up to a trout stream where every cast was hooked to another 10 inch trout. “Wow!” the guy said to another fisherman 20 yards away. “It must be paradise!”

The other man just smiled at him and said, “You’re new, aren’t you? “-Bill Heavey

Read more : Timeless hunting skills

A fisherman holding a largemouth bass out of the water.
Ride a live bream through the dorsal fin, then throw it into a large mouth. Lance Krueger

4. Dupe a largemouth bass on a Bluegill rig

When I was in college my buddies and I used to fish open-pit lakes which were crystal clear and full of big bass easy to see as they cruised the shores. I lost count of how many casts we made on these fish with plastic worms and lizards, spinnerbaits and jigs. Most of the time our efforts were ignored and this caused us a lot of despair.

One day, when I complained that I had never caught trophy bass, my neighbor Ronnie said to me, “Son, take your father’s bait pitcher, a heavy line and a big worm hook. Thread a little bluegill on that hook, throw it in front of that big bass, and hang in there.

Following Ronnie’s advice, I went to one of our favorite booths, we called it the Basshole. I had brought with me a casting rod rigged for crappie and daddy’s Ambassador round reel on a pistol grip casting rod. It was coiled with a 20 pound line, to which I had attached a 3/0 wide shank hook. Platforms don’t get any simpler. I grabbed a few sea bream, threw them in a bucket, and started to squeeze along the shore. I quickly spotted a large bass backed up in a shadow near the mouth of a beaver lodge. I hooked one of the crappies under the dorsal fin, tapped the spool, and threw 10ft. The sunfish slapped the water and slowly sank. I watched the bass move towards her, then her monstrous gills flared up in a flash of white. The cane doubled, and I yanked, rolled, and ran along the shore. Five minutes later I was walking home with a 7 pound bass in a Walmart bag. I still have the skin mount.

Sometimes, like when I’m in someone’s $ 50,000 bass boat looking at a $ 3,000 sonar, I think of this fish. I haven’t caught a lot of them since they were bigger. —WB

5. Use bread to catch the carp

White bread. For many of us, it held pride of place next to garden worms in our early days of fishing. One slice created enough balls of dough to catch a mess of sunfish, channel cats, and even stocked trout. But like worms and floats, bread usually falls by the wayside when we move on to spinnerbaits and rubber worms. This was not the case for me, however. I might not use it for bream anymore, but if you want to mingle with carp and don’t have to be elitist about it, one bag of Wonder Bread equals hours of fun.

It’s especially deadly in the suburbs, where carp from heavily trafficked ponds and lakes (think parks) snatch their share of bread destined for ducks and geese. All you have to do is take out a few full slices and wait. The carp wedged on the bread will continue to turn and nibble the floating slices. When they do, mold a piece of bread around your hook, shaping it into the shape of a flat soccer ball. You need the bait to be wider so that it floats, but you also need to keep it compact so that it has enough weight to cast without flying off. Drop it directly on the perimeter of the chum slices and be ready. —JC

A Richard Wheatley fly fishing box.
A Richard Wheatley fly fishing box. Nick cabrera

Timeless equipment: the Wheatley fly box

I carry too many things in my fly fishing vest, I always have. Part of it is because I’m superstitious that I’m going to need something that I’m leaving behind. But above all, I love the tackle. Fly boxes take up the most space. I have one for hoppers, streamers, caddis, etc. I also have one just for the nymphs. This box is my oldest and my favorite. Not to mention the rods and reels, it is also the fanciest fishing gear I have ever owned.

It’s a Richard Wheatley box that I bought when I was 17. Looking back, I don’t know what I was thinking spending so much money on a fly box, but I’m glad I did. Twenty-two years later, the box is more beautiful than ever: striped, faded and weathered. If I continue to take care of it, there’s no reason it won’t get better in two decades. —Colin Kearns


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Poggio’s chef turns to fishing skills to offer take-out ocean meals – Marin Independent Journal

When his 12-hour day in the kitchen diminished enough to keep the morning hours free, avid fisherman and Poggio’s executive chef, Benjamin Balesteri, knew how to fill them. The 17-year-old Sausalito restaurant has halted lunch service for now, giving the chef plenty of time to hit the bay a few days a week to complete the restaurant’s classic Italian dinner menu with the most. fresh halibut, rock cod and ling cod. .

“I’ve fished and searched for ingredients all my life,” says the native of the Salinas Valley. “My mother came from a farming family and my father was a descendant of Sicilian fishermen, so my culture has always been land and water at the table.”

Balesteri got his commercial fishing license before the restaurant’s transition to take-out due to a pandemic, and now you’ll see his new catch appear on the menu the next day. More recently he grabbed ling cod and served it with braised butter beans, snow and English peas, asparagus, infused olive oil, candied lemon and capers. .

The fisherman has become a strong supporter of the Ikijimie method, a specific set of steps to kill fish that are more human and preserve flesh better to improve texture and flavor. He found that this sustainable process “makes a 100% difference in quality. “

As for holding the Michelin Bib Gourmand 2019 restaurant these days, Balesteri says it’s an unfortunate new reality.

“I don’t see the light at the end of the tunnel for us yet, but we’re doing our best to stay open to the community,” he says.

Poggio, at 777 Bridgeway, is open from 6.30am to 11.30am daily for coffee and pastries and from 4pm to 8pm on weekdays and 2pm to 8pm on weekends for dinner. Find the menu and the wine list at -50% on poggiotrattoria.com and order takeout by calling 415-332-7771 or having it delivered via Grubhub.

Dine11 is gaining momentum

Six Marin volunteers led by Jennifer Lefferts, of San Anselmo, quickly took action to adopt a Marin offshoot of the successful Los Angeles-born fundraising model, Dine11.

Dine11 Marin’s mission is to “feed healthcare workers at medical facilities in Marin, support local restaurants that have had to restrict their operations to take-out services, and unite the Marin community to help during the COVID crisis. -19 ”. Several Marin-based retirement homes have been added to the expanding network of care communities benefitting from the generosity of Marin donors. Dine11 Canal provides meals at Canal restaurant in El Palmar, Los Palillos, El Lucerito, Lotus Cuisine of India and Luna de Xelaju to immigrants in need.

Courtesy of Dine11 Marin

Thanks to Dine11 Marin, Gott’s delivered 60 lunches to Kaiser’s health workers in San Rafael.

By the end of this month, the new nonprofit will have delivered 1,745 meals to local hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, with $ 25,000 in tax-deductible donations. Every dollar funds meals purchased from a network of partner restaurants based in Marin that provide meals – Cucina, Buckeye Roadhouse, Burmatown, Gott’s, Hummingbird, Iron Springs, Juice Girl, La Toscana, Magnolia Park Kitchen, Parranga Taqueria, Perry’s Delicatessen, Playa, the Hub, the Lodge, Uchiwa Ramen, Village Pizzeria and World Wrapps.

“Overnight we had to turn to take out with curbside pickup and delivery options,” says Donna Seymour of Cucina Restaurant in San Anselmo. “For the good of our community and our staff, our priority is to keep going so that we can all survive this crisis. We love organizations like Dine11 Marin and the ability to cook delicious meals for people working on the front lines. “

Dr Kristen Matsik, obstetrician and gynecologist at MarinHealth Medical Center, says, “The anxiety and stress in our healthcare workers cannot be overstated. Having a delicious meal delivered during your shift is a very welcome relief and morale booster.

To find out more, donate, volunteer or add your hospital or restaurant to the list on Dine11Marin.org, charity.gofundme.com / dine11marin Where dine11marin.org/dine11-canal.

Do you have coffee?

In less than two years, Addictive Coffee Roasters, based in San Rafael, has grown from a garage in Terra Linda to an aircraft hangar in San Rafael to become the star cafe in the offices of companies like Facebook, LinkedIn, Fitbit. , Electronic Arts Inc., Oracle and more, and locally at Andy’s Local Markets, Libations Tasting Room, Marinwood Market, Mill Valley Market, and Pond Farm Brewing Co.

With the recent office and restaurant closures, General Manager Mike Ralls is once again focusing on direct to consumer and retail sales, giving us the ability to order the 100% Arabica specialty coffees directly from the website. Learn more about why it’s so addicting and place orders at addictivecoffee.com. Residents of Le Marin can benefit from reductions, including three bags for the price of two (MARIN241); 20% discount on orders over $ 20 (MARIN20); and free delivery until the end of May.

Roadside arrangements

The Servino restaurant in downtown Tiburon has transformed its Italian menu into take-out, but has also become a neighborhood Italian market with a curbside pickup of fresh homemade pasta, sauces, and storage items. food, essential cleaning supplies, wine, liquors in small batches and even a 27-pound box of vegetables. You can also order children’s pizza kits and a Sunday family dinner. The restaurant is at 9 Main Street. Call 415-435-2676 or go to servino.com.

The Caffe Acri de Tiburon has reopened and in addition to offering its regular dishes (coffee, espresso, produce, baked goods, soup, sandwiches and beer), it is a corner market source for the pantry. and baking supplies, including the hard-to-find items like baking powder, flour, and toilet paper. All items can be ordered online and picked up within 30 minutes between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. daily. It’s at 1 Main Street. Call 415-435-8515 or go to caffeacri.com.

Both restaurants feed local frontline workers in partnership with Frontline Foods. Find out more or make a donation on frontlinefoods.org.

Virtual learning

Finding that it’s finally time to learn how to ferment almost anything? Karin Diggs, of Kraut Source, offers a free live fermentation class at 6 p.m. Thursday on Facebook at @DriversMarket. The expert will teach how to turn vegetables, nuts, and mushrooms into superfoods using traditional techniques and modern tools, and demonstrate basic kraut-making techniques. It will also cover the health benefits of fermented foods and how to incorporate them into your diet.

Participants are encouraged to have a Kraut Source device (a smart stainless steel gadget that fits over a mason jar) to make ferments at home. Learn more and register on driversmarket.com.

More take out

Find a complete and regularly updated list of Marin restaurants offering take-out and delivery meals on the trendy bar on the Marin IJ website. If you’d like to be added, tweet with the hashtag #MarinFood or email me.

Leanne Battelle is a freelance food writer. Please email him at ij.lbattelle@gmail.com or follow Le Marin’s culinary scene at instagram.com/therealdealmarin.



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Poggio’s chef turns to fishing skills to offer take-out ocean meals – Marin Independent Journal

When his 12-hour day in the kitchen diminished enough to keep the morning hours free, avid fisherman and Poggio’s executive chef, Benjamin Balesteri, knew how to fill them. The 17-year-old Sausalito restaurant has halted lunch service for now, giving the chef plenty of time to hit the bay a few days a week to complete the restaurant’s classic Italian dinner menu with the most. fresh halibut, rock cod and ling cod. .

“I’ve fished and searched for ingredients all my life,” says the native of the Salinas Valley. “My mother came from a farming family and my father was a descendant of Sicilian fishermen, so my culture has always been land and water at the table.”

Balesteri got his commercial fishing license before the restaurant’s transition to take-out due to a pandemic, and now you’ll see his new catch appear on the menu the next day. More recently he grabbed ling cod and served it with braised butter beans, snow and English peas, asparagus, infused olive oil, candied lemon and capers. .

The fisherman has become a strong supporter of the Ikijimie method, a specific set of steps to kill fish that are more human and preserve flesh better to improve texture and flavor. He found that this sustainable process “makes a 100% difference in quality. “

As for holding the Michelin Bib Gourmand 2019 restaurant these days, Balesteri says it’s an unfortunate new reality.

“I don’t see the light at the end of the tunnel for us yet, but we’re doing our best to stay open to the community,” he says.

Poggio, at 777 Bridgeway, is open from 6.30am to 11.30am daily for coffee and pastries and from 4pm to 8pm on weekdays and 2pm to 8pm on weekends for dinner. Find the menu and the wine list at -50% on poggiotrattoria.com and order takeout by calling 415-332-7771 or having it delivered via Grubhub.

Dine11 is gaining momentum

Six Marin volunteers led by Jennifer Lefferts, of San Anselmo, quickly took action to adopt a Marin offshoot of the successful Los Angeles-born fundraising model, Dine11.

Dine11 Marin’s mission is to “feed healthcare workers at medical facilities in Marin, support local restaurants that have had to restrict their operations to take-out services, and unite the Marin community to help during the COVID crisis. -19 ”. Several Marin-based retirement homes have been added to the expanding network of care communities benefitting from the generosity of Marin donors. Dine11 Canal provides meals at Canal restaurant in El Palmar, Los Palillos, El Lucerito, Lotus Cuisine of India and Luna de Xelaju to immigrants in need.

Courtesy of Dine11 Marin

Thanks to Dine11 Marin, Gott’s delivered 60 lunches to Kaiser’s health workers in San Rafael.

By the end of this month, the new nonprofit will have delivered 1,745 meals to local hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, with $ 25,000 in tax-deductible donations. Every dollar funds meals purchased from a network of partner restaurants based in Marin that provide meals – Cucina, Buckeye Roadhouse, Burmatown, Gott’s, Hummingbird, Iron Springs, Juice Girl, La Toscana, Magnolia Park Kitchen, Parranga Taqueria, Perry’s Delicatessen, Playa, the Hub, the Lodge, Uchiwa Ramen, Village Pizzeria and World Wrapps.

“Overnight we had to turn to take out with curbside pickup and delivery options,” says Donna Seymour of Cucina Restaurant in San Anselmo. “For the good of our community and our staff, our priority is to keep going so that we can all survive this crisis. We love organizations like Dine11 Marin and the ability to cook delicious meals for people working on the front lines. “

Dr Kristen Matsik, obstetrician and gynecologist at MarinHealth Medical Center, says, “The anxiety and stress in our healthcare workers cannot be overstated. Having a delicious meal delivered during your shift is a very welcome relief and morale booster.

To find out more, donate, volunteer or add your hospital or restaurant to the list on Dine11Marin.org, charity.gofundme.com / dine11marin Where dine11marin.org/dine11-canal.

Do you have coffee?

In less than two years, Addictive Coffee Roasters, based in San Rafael, has grown from a garage in Terra Linda to an aircraft hangar in San Rafael to become the star cafe in the offices of companies like Facebook, LinkedIn, Fitbit. , Electronic Arts Inc., Oracle and more, and locally at Andy’s Local Markets, Libations Tasting Room, Marinwood Market, Mill Valley Market, and Pond Farm Brewing Co.

With the recent office and restaurant closures, General Manager Mike Ralls is once again focusing on direct to consumer and retail sales, giving us the ability to order the 100% Arabica specialty coffees directly from the website. Learn more about why it’s so addicting and place orders at addictivecoffee.com. Residents of Le Marin can benefit from reductions, including three bags for the price of two (MARIN241); 20% discount on orders over $ 20 (MARIN20); and free delivery until the end of May.

Roadside arrangements

The Servino restaurant in downtown Tiburon has transformed its Italian menu into take-out, but has also become a neighborhood Italian market with a curbside pickup of fresh homemade pasta, sauces, and storage items. food, essential cleaning supplies, wine, liquors in small batches and even a 27-pound box of vegetables. You can also order children’s pizza kits and a Sunday family dinner. The restaurant is at 9 Main Street. Call 415-435-2676 or go to servino.com.

The Caffe Acri de Tiburon has reopened and in addition to offering its regular dishes (coffee, espresso, produce, baked goods, soup, sandwiches and beer), it is a corner market source for the pantry. and baking supplies, including the hard-to-find items like baking powder, flour, and toilet paper. All items can be ordered online and picked up within 30 minutes between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. daily. It’s at 1 Main Street. Call 415-435-8515 or go to caffeacri.com.

Both restaurants feed local frontline workers in partnership with Frontline Foods. Find out more or make a donation on frontlinefoods.org.

Virtual learning

Finding that it’s finally time to learn how to ferment almost anything? Karin Diggs, of Kraut Source, offers a free live fermentation class at 6 p.m. Thursday on Facebook at @DriversMarket. The expert will teach how to turn vegetables, nuts, and mushrooms into superfoods using traditional techniques and modern tools, and demonstrate basic kraut-making techniques. It will also cover the health benefits of fermented foods and how to incorporate them into your diet.

Participants are encouraged to have a Kraut Source device (a smart stainless steel gadget that fits over a mason jar) to make ferments at home. Learn more and register on driversmarket.com.

More take out

Find a complete and regularly updated list of Marin restaurants offering take-out and delivery meals on the trendy bar on the Marin IJ website. If you’d like to be added, tweet with the hashtag #MarinFood or email me.

Leanne Battelle is a freelance food writer. Please email him at ij.lbattelle@gmail.com or follow Le Marin’s culinary scene at instagram.com/therealdealmarin.



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